CCS C Software and Maintenance Offers
FAQFAQ   FAQForum Help   FAQOfficial CCS Support   SearchSearch  RegisterRegister 

ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

CCS does not monitor this forum on a regular basis.

Please do not post bug Reports on this forum. Send them to support@ccsinfo.com

ICD RJ12 connector on target board

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    CCS Forum Index -> CCS ICD / Mach X / Load-n-Go
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Igor



Joined: 26 Oct 2004
Posts: 2
Location: Serbia

View user's profile Send private message

ICD RJ12 connector on target board
PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2004 4:32 am     Reply with quote

What RJ12 connector should I use on my target board?

I already developed PCBs and I'm going to place order for ICD-U40 so I want to add ICD RJ12 connector to my PCBs before I get ICD-U40 but it seems that there are two different types of RJ12 connectors??? Difference is in height!? Confused

Can someone, please, provide some link to RJ12 connector drawings that I should use on my target PCB so that I know what RJ12 to order from my supplier?

Regards,
Igor[/b]
Mark



Joined: 07 Sep 2003
Posts: 2838
Location: Atlanta, GA

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2004 6:44 am     Reply with quote

I use an RJ11 6 position 6 conductor.
Haplo



Joined: 06 Sep 2003
Posts: 659
Location: Sydney, Australia

View user's profile Send private message

PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2004 7:09 am     Reply with quote

Mark wrote:
I use an RJ11 6 position 6 conductor.


That is actually called RJ12 Very Happy

So as long as you get RJ12 6P6C you are ok.
Mark



Joined: 07 Sep 2003
Posts: 2838
Location: Atlanta, GA

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2004 8:46 am     Reply with quote

Well, its an RJ11 Razz here in good old USA. Try and find an RJ12 vs an RJ11 and you will see an abundance of RJ11's. The poster is trying to find one which I hope he has already searched for. Therefore, I conclude that he is having a hard time so he should try and search for an RJ11.

Quote:

"RJ11, RJ12 AND RJ45" SOCKETS

Part 68 of Volume 47 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (sometimes referred to on product labels as "FCC 68" or "Complies with FCC Part 68")defines in detail the mechanical specifications of the standard 6-way and 8-way North American modular sockets (which they refer to as "jacks") and their associated plugs. A smaller 4-way modular plug is commonly used for handsets and for line cord connections to the CPE, but not for connection to the fixed wiring. There are also "keyed" versions of these plugs and sockets, with slightly different plastic mouldings. These can be used for specific applications in North America, but we rarely see them in this country.

All of these sockets can be installed or pre-wired with a wide range of options, integral switch contacts, etc. Some examples of these wiring and contact arrangements are defined in Part 68 of the Federal Regulations with specific "USOC" numbers. "USOC" is the "Universal Service Order Code" used in the North American market. The various standardised "socket/wiring/contact" combinations are each given one of these USOC "RJ-series" ("Registered Jack") numbers so that there is a common reference for ordering any particular type. These codes can also be used for specifying wiring installation requirements. e.g., the number of lines to be terminated on a single socket and on what pins they are to be terminated. For example, 6-way sockets are normally used for telephone line connections, but may have 2, 4 or 6 wires connected. The actual USOC codes for these are "RJ11", "RJ14" and "RJ25", whereas we usually refer to the 6-way socket as "RJ12" - hence one source of confusion.

To further complicate matters, the 8-way and 4-way sockets are commonly termed "RJ45" and "RJ11" in New Zealand and Australia. Again, these are not the correct terms in North America. USOC codes are much more explicit and usually also have suffix letters. The suffix letter "C" is used to define a flush-mounted socket and "W" is used to define a wall-mounted socket. Other suffix examples are the "RJ38X" and "RJ48X", sometimes used here to provide by-pass arrangements for security alarm connections with line grabbing. The "X" indicates a series connection. Both are variants of the 8-way socket, with auxiliary shorting bars. In general, several different "RJ numbers" are used to define the many 6-way and 8-way socket variants.
PCM programmer



Joined: 06 Sep 2003
Posts: 18023

View user's profile Send private message

PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2004 1:16 pm     Reply with quote

But Mark, what about the RJ11 to 2x5 pin header adapter that
you recommended in a previous post ? That seems like a good
idea. It lets you put a cheap header on the board, instead of an RJ11.

I did a web search for: ICD2 adapter
and it seems like there's a lot of them. On some of these pages,
you have to scroll down to see the adapter.
http://www.hvwtech.com/pages/products_view.asp?ProductID=549
http://picbasic.com/products/accessry.htm
http://microcontrollershop.com/product_info.php?products_id=664
http://www.microengineeringlabs.com/products/labx3.htm
There are a lot more pages beyond this.

If you want to use a 6-pin inline header instead of a 2x5 header,
then here's my method, as detailed in this post.
http://www.ccsinfo.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=19157
The advantage of the 6x1 format is that you don't have to install
a header on the board. You just leave it as a pad pattern.
Then you insert a 6x1 header into the programmer connector
and insert that into the board temporarily during programming.
You hold it at an angle while applying pressure with your hand
in order to make contact with the pads
Haplo



Joined: 06 Sep 2003
Posts: 659
Location: Sydney, Australia

View user's profile Send private message

PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2004 6:34 pm     Reply with quote

PCM programmer wrote:
If you want to use a 6-pin inline header instead of a 2x5 header,
then here's my method, as detailed in this post.
http://www.ccsinfo.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=19157
The advantage of the 6x1 format is that you don't have to install
a header on the board. You just leave it as a pad pattern.
Then you insert a 6x1 header into the programmer connector
and insert that into the board temporarily during programming.
You hold it at an angle while applying pressure with your hand
in order to make contact with the pads


That is what I always use. It is cheaper and easier, and it takes much less space on the board. That has been a very important factor in most of my designs.
Mark



Joined: 07 Sep 2003
Posts: 2838
Location: Atlanta, GA

View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail

PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2004 9:23 pm     Reply with quote

Quote:
The advantage of the 6x1 format is that you don't have to install
a header on the board. You just leave it as a pad pattern.
Then you insert a 6x1 header into the programmer connector
and insert that into the board temporarily during programming.
You hold it at an angle while applying pressure with your hand
in order to make contact with the pads


Ever heard of "pogo pins" or "bed of nails". This works pretty good if you have to do a lot of incircuit programming. I have taken a blank board, soldered "pogo pins" in place of the header and then connected the pogo pins to the programmer. The mounting holes can be used as alignment posts.


Now about those headers. If you stick to the same layout, its a good idea. I do mostly Windows software and the firmware for the micros. Another individual does most of the hardware. He can't seem to use the same connection each time. I am getting way too many adapters. The lastest was for a small control station that goes into a single gang box. Since it is such a small device, he found the smallest IDC connector he could. Now I usually check the schematics but just assume that he is using the same connector. I don't know how he planned on me making an adapter for it. Needless to say, I made him change it to one of the "standard" ones that he uses. Not sure which one Wink but so long as its on .1 centers I won't complain too much.

The RJ11 has the advantage that it is the easiest to make a cable for. I do like it, but someone is bound to plug a phone into it!
Igor



Joined: 26 Oct 2004
Posts: 2
Location: Serbia

View user's profile Send private message

PostPosted: Sat Oct 30, 2004 9:16 am     Reply with quote

Thanks to everyone. Problem solved.

I will go with standard RJ12 but for production I will probably use just 6x1 pads. I can't afford having RJ12 connector on 20x25mm PCB Very Happy

Regards,
Igor
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    CCS Forum Index -> CCS ICD / Mach X / Load-n-Go All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group