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Idiot Electronics Question

 
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Regular Guy



Joined: 04 Jun 2017
Posts: 110

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Idiot Electronics Question
PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2022 2:57 pm     Reply with quote

Resistor capacitor circuit.

Will the combo's they mention in the datasheet of a PIC run

by themselves? Without the PIC?

Just put a resistor and a capacitor on a breadboard.

We want to make a 'signal generator' for testing oscilloscopes.

Will R/C circuits run at khz frequencies like data sheet says?

200 khz and what not.

Thanks!
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temtronic



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2022 5:29 pm     Reply with quote

no
yes
BTW, there's an example program, comes with compiler, that would be IDEAL as an oscilloscope test pattern generator....
Ttelmah



Joined: 11 Mar 2010
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2022 2:57 am     Reply with quote

As Jay says to the first bit. No.

The key is there has to be gain added somewhere. Things like RC circuits
all introduce losses. Put a signal in, and it'll come out the other end
with some phase shift and reduction in the signal. To make it oscillate,
there has to be something to put back those losses. A simple transistor
amplifier, or a op-amp.
Have a look here are the basic RC oscillator:
[url]
https://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/oscillator/rc_oscillator.html
[/url]

The PIC RC oscillator, is a simple charge discharge oscillator, not a
sinusoidal oscillator. This can be done using a comparator (or even
easier an NE555). This won't give anything resembling a sine wave.
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